Tuesday, February 11, 2014

If Your Dream Doesn't Scare You... It Isn't Big Enough

Monday, February 3, 2014

3 Volunteer Opportunities That Will Seriously Boost Your Career

Volunteering: it's time for reflection, purpose, and perspective.  But did you ever think about the fact that it could also be good for your career?  Check out this piece from Allison Jones of the Daily Muse which includes some interesting ideas on building your network while working in the community. Allison writes:
Too Many Choices, Too Little Time: Juggling All The Things You Love To Do - See more at: http://www.j-walking.com/2012/09/too-many-choices-too-little-time.html#sthash.z7NHukLV.dpuf

People are buzzing about volunteering these days, and with good reason: Studies have shown that volunteering strengthens communities, is good for your health—and can even help you land a job. However, if you are a busy professional, it can be challenging to find an opportunity that allows you to give back and move forward. Chances are, you want to do something related to a cause you truly care about, that fits into your busy schedule, and that can make the best use of your talents—maybe even giving you the opportunity to bolster your professional reputation. How many types of volunteer opportunities really fit that bill? Well, depending on what type of experience you’re looking for, plenty. Here are three opportunities to consider.


1.   Become a Charity Board Member
What’s one thing that all 1.5 million nonprofits in the United States have in common? They all have a board of directors! Boards of directors are the governing bodies of nonprofits, and they approve budgets, establish long-term strategy, oversee various organizational policies, and help raise money. And given the wide range of responsibilities a board of directors has, they need people from all backgrounds to join.

Sunday, January 26, 2014

Thursday, January 23, 2014

Make Time to Live A Life

I really appreciated Reb Rebele recent HuffPost article on how to best utilize our time off. As a lawyer with billable hour requirements, it's so easy for me to fall into the rut of feeling like I constantly have work hanging over my head. And while I'm not always super productive at the office, I am often very good about half-assing the precious time off I have.  Rebele reminded me that not only is it important to shift to non-work mode, but it's equally important to consciously diversify how we choose to use that time.

He writes:

Wednesday, January 15, 2014

Now I Have to Worry About Getting a Thut? What?!


Move over saddle bags, muffin top, and arm flab... apparently there is yet another threat to a woman's positive body image. Coined by NYMag.com, the "thut" forms when the muscles on the back of a woman’s legs are underdeveloped, leading to a sagging buttocks and weak hamstrings. According to the Daily Mail, the thut poses more than just an issue of aesthetics, it can affect the critical muscles in our postural support group that are utilized for standing, lifting, and walking movements.

This "grouping's lack of development can be attributed to a shift in working culture, where many Americans sit in a desk chair all day rather than working in manual-labor-intensive occupations." And, unfortunately, I'm an (in)active member of the desk-bound who are literally sitting on our weakening thuts all day. But that doesn't mean it's hopeless! Here's some things you can do to fight the thut:

Sunday, January 12, 2014

Is it Possible to Be Powerful, Likable, and Female?


Recent research has indicated today's female leaders often face a seeming catch-22: if they are aggressive, assertive, and analytical, they are likely to be threatening to their peers and disliked by their employees.  In contrast, if they are understanding and emphasize team work, they'll be viewed as likeable, but also less competent than their male peers. Despite these discouraging findings, I know I'm not alone in believing that women can absolutely be effective and likeable leaders. 

What a breath of fresh air it was to read Ann Friedman NYMag.com's article on an accomplished and charismatic exec that girls can really look up to: Jenna Lyons, President and Creative Director of J.Crew. In the piece, Friedman re-defines the concept of likeability by making it less about gender stereotyped traits of aggression and submission and more about honesty and authenticity- in all circumstances. 


if she is understanding and focused on team building, a female boss will be seen as less competent by her peers but will be better liked by her employees. And if she's aggressive, assertive, and analytical, she will be too threatening to her peers and disliked by her employees. - See more at: http://www.j-walking.com/2012/07/future-female-executives-whose-shoes.html#sthash.Qj4vJ5Wi.dpuf
if she is understanding and focused on team building, a female boss will be seen as less competent by her peers but will be better liked by her employees. And if she's aggressive, assertive, and analytical, she will be too threatening to her peers and disliked by her employees. - See more at: http://www.j-walking.com/2012/07/future-female-executives-whose-shoes.html#sthash.Qj4vJ5Wi.dpuf
The full article is after the jump: 

Saturday, January 4, 2014

Fashion Resolution: Sparkle at the Office

The holidays are over and for most of us that means New Years resolutions and the dreaded return to work. But just because it may be time to pack up the Christmas decorations, doesn't mean you need to push your festive fashion to the back of the closet. Contrary to popular belief, I think sequins and shine can be totally office appropriate.  Here's a few simple guidelines to help you sparkle at work!
  
1) Less is more.  Think of bling as a playful accent, not the star of the show.  


Sunday, December 15, 2013

10 Things Not To Say At Work

Recently Neha Gandhi, of Refinery29.com, wrote about the ten things you're very possibly saying that could totally be working against you.  Beyond the generic discourse on gender stereotypes and their negative impact in the workplace, this article squarely addresses  how women's use of certain words and speech patterns may actually be betraying the very image we're attempting to project. The article is smart, it's honest, and I gotta say, it stung a little the first time I read it.  Why? Because I'm definitely been guilty of more of these than I want to admit.  
 

Check out Neha's piece here:

We all know that presentation matters. You need to dress for the job you want, and you want to generally represent yourself as a competent, intelligent, professional human being, if you want to be taken seriously - and get your way as often as possible. And really, who doesn't want that?

A huge piece of that? The way you speak. Sure, your ideas are great, and you're always right. But are you undermining all of that brilliance in the way you formulate your sentences? We've all heard about uptalk and how it makes you seem less self-assured, but that's not the only secret saboteur you've probably got hiding in your everyday vocabulary. 

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